LESSON EIGHTEEN - INDEX OF HTML 2.0 AND HTML 3.2 TAGS


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Return to Home Page | | Introduction | | Alphabetical index of HTML 2.0 tags | | Alphabetical index of HTML 3.2 (Wilbur) tags | | Grouping the tags | | Tags in HTML 3.2 that are not part of HTML 2.0 | | Alphabetical index of HTML 3.2 tags including the attributes | | The FRAME tag |


INTRODUCTION

The World Wide Web Consortium, known as W3C, was founded in 1994 to develop common protocols for the evolution of the World Wide Web. The W3C is an international industry consortium made up of Key Industry Players, Content Specialists and Experts and is jointly hosted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Computer Science (MIT/LCS) in the United States; the Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA) in Europe; and the Keio University Shonan Fujisawa Campus in Asia. Membership is open to any organization that signs a membership agreement (W3C cannot take individual memberships).

It is this Consortium that finds the common specifications for the World Wide Web for organizations to build on. In other words, it is the Consortium's HTML working group that comes out with all these different versions of HTML.

HTML is a language under construction. There are really three main driving forces that determine what the next version of HTML will look like: (1) the World Wide Web Consortium, (2) Mozilla (owner of Firefox and Netscape) and (3) Microsoft (owner of Internet Explorer). Now both Mozilla and Microsoft have agreed to abide by the decisions of the W3C of which they are members. However, these two companies are also in a battle to increase the popularity of their browsers. As a result each company has produced a number of extension tags in the hopes of tipping the balance in their favor. In this lesson, I am only indexing tags sanctioned by the W3C. However, at the end of the lesson (the last choice in the menu at the top of this page), I give the tags and attributes associated with frames even though they are not part of HTML 2.0 or HTML 3.2, because Firefox, Netscape and Explorer support them. Note: these frame tags and attributes became standard with HTML 4.0.

If you start using a lot of tags and attributes that are only supported by a specific browser (such as Explorer), you should consider warning viewers that the page is best viewed in that particular browser.

This lesson begins with a listing of all the tags as defined in HTML version 2.0 specifications (HTML 2.0). Until January 1997, the "official" version of HTML was HTML 2.0.

The current recommendation by the W3C HTML working group is HTML 3.2 also known as "Wilbur". It became a recommendation in January, 1997.

HTML 4.0, also known as "Cougar", is W3C's next version of HTML. This version was formally announced by the HTML working group in April, 1997. This is a work in progress and is expected to become a proposed recommendation after a period of public review.


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ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF HTML 2.0 TAGS

Here is a simple alphabetical listing of HTML 2.0 tags.

<!-->, <A>, <ADDRESS>, <B>, <BASE>, <BLOCKQUOTE>, <BODY>, <BR>, <CITE>, <CODE>, <DD>, <DIR>, <DL>, <DT>, <EM>, <FORM,> <H1>, <H2>, <H3>, <H4>, <H5>, <H6>, <HEAD>, <HR>, <HTML>, <I>, <IMG>, <INPUT>, <ISINDEX>, <KBD>, <LI>, <LINK>, <MENU>, <META>, <OL>, <OPTION>, <P>, <PRE>, <SAMP>, <SELECT>, <STRONG>, <TEXTAREA>, <TITLE>, <TT>, <UL>, <VAR>

The following is an alphabetical listing of these HTML 2.0 tags along with a statement when each tag is used. A click on the tag name will take you to the lesson where the tag is first introduced.

<!--> - To insert an invisible comment
<A> - To create a link or anchor
<ADDRESS> - To indicate address information
<B> - To display text in boldface
<BASE> - To specify the URL of the document used to generate any relative URLs
<BLOCKQUOTE> - To indicate that a block of text is a quotation
<BODY> - To enclosed the main section of a web page
<BR> - To create a line break
<CITE> - To indicate that the text is a short citation
<CODE> - To indicate text is a computer code
<DD> - To indicate a definition description in a definition list
<DIR> - To create a directory list
<DL> - To create a definition list
<DT> - To indicate a term to be defined in the definition list
<EM> - To emphasize text, usually in italics
<FORM> - To create an input form
<H1> - To create a level 1 header
<H2> - To create a level 2 header
<H3> - To create a level 3 header
<H4> - To create a level 4 header
<H5> - To create a level 5 header
<H6> - To create a level 6 header
<HEAD> - To create the head section of the web page
<HR> - To create a horizontal line (horizontal rule)
<HTML> - To identify the document as an HTML document
<I> - To display text in italics
<IMG> - To place an image on the web page
<INPUT> - To create a form element such as an input field, button, etc.
<ISINDEX> - To create a primitive search
<KBD> - To indicate text from a keyboard
<LI> - To create a list item
<LINK> - To define relationships between documents and to link to an external style sheet
<MENU> - To create a menu item list
<META> - To create an automatic page jump plus also used for document information
<OL> - To create an ordered list
<OPTION> - To create individual options in a form menu
<P> - To create a new paragraph
<PRE> - To create preformatted text
<SAMP> - To display sample text that should be used literally
<SELECT> - To create a menu in a form
<STRONG> - To strongly emphasize text, usually in boldface
<TEXTAREA> - To create a block area for text input in a form
<TITLE> - To create the document title
<TT> - To display text in a monospaced teletype font
<UL> - To create an unordered list
<VAR> - To indicate that the text is a variable


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ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF HTML 3.2 (WILBUR) TAGS

Here first is a simple alphabetical listing of the HTML 3.2 tags. Note that the HTML 3.2 tags include all the HTML 2.0 tags.

<!-->, <A>, <ADDRESS>, <APPLET>, <AREA>, <B>, <BASE>, <BASEFONT>, <BIG>, <BLOCKQUOTE>, <BODY>, <BR>, <CAPTION>, <CENTER>, <CITE>, <CODE>, <DD>, <DFN>, <DIR>, <DIV>, <DL>, <DT>, <EM>, <FONT>, <FORM> <H1>, <H2>, <H3>, <H4>, <H5>, <H6>, <HEAD>, <HR>, <HTML>, <I>, <IMG>, <INPUT>, <ISINDEX>, <KBD>, <LINK>, <LI>, <MAP>, <MENU>, <META>, <OL>, <OPTION>, <P>, <PARAM>, <PRE>, <SAMP>, <SCRIPT>, <SELECT>, <SMALL>, <STRIKE>, <STRONG>, <STYLE>, <SUB>, <SUP>, <TABLE>, <TD>, <TEXTAREA> <TH>, <TITLE>, <TR>, <TT>, <U>, <UL>, <VAR>

Below is an alphabetical listing of these HTML 3.2 tags along with a statement when each tag is used. A click on the tag name will take you to the lesson where the tag is first introduced.

<!--> - To insert an invisible comment
<A> - To create a link or anchor
<ADDRESS> - To indicate address information
<APPLET> - To insert an applet
<AREA> - To specify the coordinates of an image map
<B> - To display text in boldface
<BASE> - To specify the URL of the document used to generate any relative URLs
<BASEFONT> - To change the default font size throughout the entire page
<BIG> - To make text bigger than the surrounding text
<BLOCKQUOTE> - To indicate that a block of text is a quotation
<BODY> - To enclosed the main section of a web page
<BR> - To create a line break
<CAPTION> - To create a caption for a table
<CENTER> - To center text, images and other elements
<CITE> - To indicate that the text is a short citation
<CODE> - To indicate text is a computer code
<DD> - To indicate a definition description in a definition list
<DFN> - To indicate the definition of a term when used for the first time
<DIR> - To create a directory list
<DIV> - To divide a page into logical sections
<DL> - To create a definition list
<DT> - To indicate a term to be defined in the definition list
<EM> - To emphasize text, usually in italics
<FONT> - To change the size, face and color of individual letters or words
<FORM> - To create an input form
<H1> - To create a level 1 header
<H2> - To create a level 2 header
<H3> - To create a level 3 header
<H4> - To create a level 4 header
<H5> - To create a level 5 header
<H6> - To create a level 6 header
<HEAD> - To create the head section of the web page
<HR> - To create a horizontal line (horizontal rule)
<HTML> - To identify the document as an HTML document
<I> - To display text in italics
<IMG> - To place an image on the web page
<INPUT> - To create a form element such as an input field, button, etc.
<ISINDEX> - To create a primitive search
<KBD> - To indicate text from a keyboard
<LI> - To create a list item
<LINK> - To define relationships between documents and to link to an external style sheet
<MAP> - To create a client-side image map
<MENU> - To create a menu item list
<META> - To create an automatic page jump plus also used for document information
<OL> - To create an ordered list
<OPTION> - To create individual options in a form menu
<P> - To create a new paragraph
<PARAM> - To transfer a parameter to an applet
<PRE> - To create preformatted text
<SAMP> - To display sample text that should be used literally
<SCRIPT> - To create an in-line script
<SELECT> - To create a menu in a form
<SMALL> - To make text smaller than the surrounding text
<STRIKE> - To display text with a line through it (same as <S>)
<STRONG> - To strongly emphasize text, usually in boldface
<STYLE> - To set up style information
<SUB> - To create a subscript
<SUP> - To create a superscript
<TABLE> - To create a table
<TD> - To create a regular cell in a table
<TEXTAREA> - To create a block area for text input in a form
<TH> - To create a header cell in a table
<TITLE> - To create the document title
<TR> - To create a new row in a table
<TT> - To display text in a monospaced teletype font
<U> - To place a line underneath text
<UL> - To create an unordered list
<VAR> - To indicate that the text is a variable


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GROUPING THE TAGS

Here is a breakdown of the HTML 3.2 elements into groups beginning with the elements that, if used, must be placed in the HEAD section of the HTML document.

Elements for the HEAD section

The HEAD section of a document may only contain the following elements. If any other elements or plain text occur inside the HEAD section, the browser will assume the HEAD section has ended and that the BODY section has started.

<BASE> - To specify the URL of the document used to generate any relative URLs
<ISINDEX> - To create a primitive search
<LINK> - To define relationships between documents and to link to an external style sheet
<META> - To create an automatic page jump plus also used for document information
<SCRIPT> - To create an in-line script
<STYLE> - To set up style information
<TITLE> - To create the document title

Elements for the BODY section

There are two types of elements in the BODY section and they are block-level elements and text-level elements. Elements that generate a new paragraph such as a header tag (for example <H1>) or a paragraph tag (<P>), are called block-level elements. Text-level elements (also called in-line elements) are elements that do not generate a new paragraph (examples are <EM> and <STRONG>).

Block-level elements

The BODY of a document consists of multiple block-level elements. Here are the block-level elements:

Headings

<H1> - To create a level 1 header
<H2> - To create a level 2 header
<H3> - To create a level 3 header
<H4> - To create a level 4 header
<H5> - To create a level 5 header
<H6> - To create a level 6 header

Lists

<DD> - To indicate a definition description in a definition list
<DIR> - To create a directory list
<DL> - To create a definition list
<DT> - To indicate a term to be defined in the definition list
<LI> - To create a list item
<MENU> - To create a menu item list
<OL> - To create an ordered list
<UL> - To create an unordered list

Text containers

<ADDRESS> - To indicate address information
<BLOCKQUOTE> - To indicate that a block of text is a quotation
<P> - To create a new paragraph
<PRE> - To create preformatted text

Others

<CENTER> - To center text, images and other elements
<DIV> - To divide a page into logical sections
<FORM> - To create an input form
<HR> - To create a horizontal line (horizontal rule)
<TABLE> - To create a table

Text-level elements

These elements are used to mark up text inside block-level elements.

Logical markup

<CITE> - To indicate that the text is a short citation
<CODE> - To indicate text is a computer code
<DFN> - To indicate the definition of a term when used for the first time
<EM> - To emphasize text, usually in italics
<KBD> - To indicate text from a keyboard
<SAMP> - To display sample text that should be used literally
<STRONG> - To strongly emphasize text, usually in boldface
<VAR> - To indicate that the text is a variable

Physical markup

<B> - To display text in boldface
<BIG> - To make text bigger than the surrounding text
<I> - To display text in italics
<SMALL> - To make text smaller than the surrounding text
<STRIKE> - To display text with a line through it (same as <S>)
<SUB> - To create a subscript
<SUP> - To create a superscript
<TT> - To display text in a monospaced teletype font
<U> - To place a line underneath text

Special markup

<A> - To create a link or anchor
<APPLET> - To insert an applet
<AREA> - To specify the coordinates of an image map
<BASEFONT> - To change the default font size throughout the entire page
<BR> - To create a line break
<FONT> - To change the size, face and color of individual letters or words
<IMG> - To place an image on the web page
<MAP> - To create a client-side image map
<PARAM> - To transfer a parameter to an applet

Forms

<INPUT> - To create a form element such as an input field, button, etc.
<OPTION> - To create individual options in a form menu
<SELECT> - To create a menu in a form
<TEXTAREA> - To create a block area for text input in a form

Tables

<CAPTION> - To create a caption for a table
<TD> - To create a regular cell in a table
<TH> - To create a header cell in a table
<TR> - To create a new row in a table


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TAGS IN HTML 3.2 THAT ARE NOT PART OF HTML 2.O

The following is a list of tags that are part of HTML 3.2 but not part of HTML 2.0.

<APPLET> - To insert an applet
<AREA> - To specify the coordinates of an image map
<BASEFONT> - To change the default font size throughout the entire page
<BIG> - To make text bigger than the surrounding text
<CAPTION> - To create a caption for a table
<CENTER> - To center text, images and other elements
<DIV> - To divide a page into logical sections
<DFN> - To indicate the definition of a term when used for the first time
<FONT> - To change the size, face and color of individual letters or words
<MAP> - To create a client-side image map
<PARAM> - To transfer a parameter to an applet
<SCRIPT> - To create an in-line script
<SMALL> - To make text smaller than the surrounding text
<STRIKE> - To display text with a line through it (same as <S>)
<STYLE> - To set up style information
<SUB> - To create a subscript
<SUP> - To create a superscript
<TABLE> - To create a table
<TD> - To create a regular cell in a table
<TH> - To create a header cell in a table
<TR> - To create a new row in a table
<U> - To place a line underneath text


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ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF HTML 3.2 TAGS INCLUDING THE ATTRIBUTES

We will conclude this lesson with an alphabetical listing of HTML 3.2 tags along with their attributes if applicable. For any tag that has one or more attributes, the attributes are bulleted and immediately follow the tag. A click on the tag name will take you to the lesson where the tag is first introduced.

<!--> - To insert an invisible comment
<A> - To create a link or anchor

<ADDRESS> - To indicate address information
<APPLET> - To insert an applet <AREA> - To specify the coordinates of an image map <B> - To display text in boldface
<BASE> - To specify the URL of the document used to generate any relative URLs
<BASEFONT> - To change the default font size throughout the entire page <BIG> - To make text bigger than the surrounding text
<BLOCKQUOTE> - To indicate that a block of text is a quotation
<BODY> - To enclosed the main section of a web page <BR> - To create a line break <CAPTION> - To create a caption for a table <CENTER> - To center text, images and other elements
<CITE> - To indicate that the text is a short citation
<CODE> - To indicate text is a computer code
<DD> - To indicate a definition description in a definition list
<DFN> - To indicate the definition of a term when used for the first time
<DIR> - To create a directory list
<DIV> - To divide a page into logical sections <DL> - To create a definition list
<DT> - To indicate a term to be defined in the definition list
<EM> - To emphasize text, usually in italics
<FONT> - To change the size, face and color of individual letters or words <FORM> - To create an input form <H1> - To create a level 1 header <H2> - To create a level 2 header <H3> - To create a level 3 header <H4> - To create a level 4 header <H5> - To create a level 5 header <H6> - To create a level 6 header <HEAD> - To create the head section of the web page
<HR> - To create a horizontal line (horizontal rule) <HTML> - To identify the document as an HTML document
<I> - To display text in italics
<IMG> - To place an image on the web page <INPUT> - To create a form element such as an input field, button, etc. <ISINDEX> - To create a primitive search
<KBD> - To indicate text from a keyboard
<LI> - To create a list item <LINK> - To define relationships between documents and to link to an external style sheet
<MAP> - To create a client-side image map <MENU> - To create a menu item list
<META> - To create an automatic page jump plus also used for document information
<OL> - To create an ordered list <OPTION> - To create individual options in a form menu <P> - To create a new paragraph <PARAM> - To transfer a parameter to an applet
<PRE> - To create preformatted text
<SAMP> - To display sample text that should be used literally
<SCRIPT> - To create an in-line script
<SELECT> - To create a menu in a form <SMALL> - To make text smaller than the surrounding text
<STRIKE> - To display text with a line through it (same as <S>)
<STRONG> - To strongly emphasize text, usually in boldface
<STYLE> - To set up style information
<SUB> - To create a subscript
<SUP> - To create a superscript
<TABLE> - To create a table <TD> - To create a regular cell in a table <TEXTAREA> - To create a block area for text input in a form <TH> - To create a header cell in a table <TITLE> - To create the document title
<TR> - To create a new row in a table <TT> - To display text in a monospaced teletype font
<U> - To place a line underneath text
<UL> - To create an unordered list <VAR> - To indicate that the text is a variable


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THE FRAME TAG

The FRAME element is not part of HTML 2.0 or HTML 3.2. However, it became a standard in HTML 4.0 and so Firefox, Netscape and Explorer browsers do support frames making frames increasingly popular among web page designers. So here are the tags and attributes associated with frames that are supported by Firefox, Netscape and Internet Explorer:

<FRAME> - To create frames

<FRAMESET> - To define a frameset <NOFRAMES> - To provide an alternative to frames for browsers that do not recognize them



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